Sunday, March 3, 2024
Waste Management

Introduction to Waste Management and Sources of Waste

An indicator of a healthy ecosystem is its ability to naturally decompose wastes into smaller base components for example, water, minerals, and nutrients that are ultimately recycled back into the environment.

Such natural systems and processes are an essential component of healthy communities as they retain ecosystem integrity and protect the health and safety of human populations (International Solid Waste Association, 2002).

Compared to other organisms, humans generate a variety of wastes that cannot be processed by natural systems, and as such must be managed through collective human action.

Effective waste management systems must engage multiple stakeholders on several fronts and include education, hazard reduction and waste diversion components. Within Ontario we utilize several waste management systems including landfill, compost and recycling programs, incineration, and reduction-diversion strategies.

Waste is a particularly pressing issue in Canada. As a country, they produce more waste per capita than most other countries on earth (Environmental Commissioner of Ontario, 2017).

According to a 2016 report from the Environmental Commissioner of Ontario between 2002 and 2016, the total amount of solid waste collected in Canada increased by 3.5 million tonnes (11%) and the amount of waste disposed in landfills or incinerators increased by 0.9 million tonnes (4%).

Whenever firefighting equipment has been used, an immediate report must be made to the Safety Officer or to the Fire Safety Unit (If there is one) so that the equipment may be recharged or replaced.

In all buildings, particularly residences, protection of human life must take priority over fighting fires. The person discovering a fire must promptly initiate the emergency procedures listed above. Delay can be fatal as, once a fire is out of control, it can spread rapidly and cut off escape routes.

If allowed by the organisation, especially when trained, and without endangering personal safety, attempts can be made to contain and control a fire until the Fire Service arrives.

It must be ensured that the correct type of fire extinguisher is used. The wrong choice can turn a minor incident into a major event.

The Fire extinguisher is used according to manufacturer’s instruction. It must be remembered to take a position between the fire and the exit so that the escape route cannot be cut off., ensure awareness of what is happening in the surrounding area and take account of limitations.

Read Also : Water and Wastewater Management Complete Guide

Even if a fire appears to have been successfully extinguished by staff, it will still be necessary to ask the Fire Service to check that the fire has not unknowingly spread, and that materials or the building fabric cannot reignite.

Unit heads must ensure that all fires within the building are recorded and reported to the Health and Safety officer or Manager

Introduction to Waste Management and Sources of Waste

Sources of Waste

Waste is generated from many sources as the result of day-to-day activities. Common sources of waste include:


Table1: Common sources
SOURCEDESCRIPTION
of wasteAgriculturalWaste created from horticulture, livestock, and nurseries can include items such as manure, plant materials and soil. Can include hazardous materials such as containers with residual pesticides.

AutomotiveReferring in this case specifically to wastes created in the manufacturing process and at vehicle end-of-life. Often includes metal, plastic and hazardous liquid material such as oil or coolant.

BiomedicalWaste produced at healthcare facilities, often hazardous, includes surgical tools, pharmaceuticals, blood, needles and human organs. Can also be referred to as Medical/Clinical waste.

ConstructionandDemolitionWaste generated through the construction or demolition of buildings, roads etc. Includes concrete debris, wood, soil and material packaging.

ElectronicsAlso known as e-waste this includes cell phones, computers, appliances, and other household materials with a cord. Some electronic waste can contain materials such as lead, mercury and cadmium which can be harmful to human health and the environment.

IndustrialWastes produced from the manufacturing of goods and processing or refinement of raw materials. Wastes produced vary by industry but could include slag, contaminated soils, aggregates, gas, and liquids.

MunicipalIncludes everyday waste materials generated in households, schools, offices, markets, or other public spaces.

In conclusion, while fire prevention is everyone’s responsibility, Fire-fighting should best be taken on by trained personnel.

It would be in the best interest with a high risk for fires as a result of their production processes to ensure fire training of every member of staff if feasible.

Otherwise it is important for all staff members to be conversant with the Fire routine procedures and participate in fire drills.

Fire is probably the most serious danger which any organisation will ever have to face. It can break out almost anywhere and can affect everyone. “Prevention is better than cure”.

Fire Control is achieved using Fire alarms, Smoke and Carbon –monoxide alarms, Fire extinguishers, Fire Doors, Fire Drills and Fire marshals. Ensure every employee is knowledgeable of the Fire Routine Procedure.

On discovery of a fire the discoverer should raise the alarm, act swiftly, do not take risks and do not panic Fire-fighting should best be taken on by trained personnel.

Effective waste management systems must engage multiple stakeholders on several fronts and include education, hazard reduction and waste diversion components. Within Ontario we utilize several waste management systems including landfill, compost and recycling programs, incineration, and reduction-diversion strategies.

Waste is a particularly pressing issue in Canada. As a country, they produce more waste per capita than most other countries on earth (Environmental Commissioner of Ontario, 2017).

According to a 2016 report from the Environmental Commissioner of Ontario between 2002 and 2016, the total amount of solid waste collected in Canada increased by 3.5 million tonnes (11%) and the amount of waste disposed in landfills or incinerators increased by 0.9 million tonnes (4%).

Ontario residents generate more than 33,000 tonnes of waste every day, equating to more than 900 kilograms per person annually (Environmental Commissioner of Ontario, 2017).

There are many challenges associated with managing waste including the possible depletion and contamination of valuable resources. Methods such as landfill and incineration may consume and contaminate air, water and soil if improperly implemented.

Additionally, the breakdown of disposed waste materials can also generate powerful greenhouse gas emissions (Environmental Commissioner of Ontario, 2017). Looking forward, Canada and Ontario must continue to explore sustainable solutions to further prevent and reduce the impacts of waste in its creation and management.

WealthInWastes

Benadine Nonye is an agricultural consultant and a writer with over 12 years of professional experience in the agriculture industry. - National Diploma in Agricultural Technology - Bachelor's Degree in Agricultural Science - Master's Degree in Science Education... Visit My Websites On: 1. Agric4Profits.com - Your Comprehensive Practical Agricultural Knowledge and Farmer’s Guide Website! 2. WealthinWastes.com - For Effective Environmental Management through Proper Waste Management and Recycling Practices! Join Me On: Twitter: @benadinenonye - Instagram: benadinenonye - LinkedIn: benadinenonye - YouTube: Agric4Profits TV and WealthInWastes TV - Pinterest: BenadineNonye4u - Facebook: BenadineNonye

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